DESERT HORSE EQUESTRIAN SERVICES



DESERT HORSE
N
EWSLETTER
June 2010



IN THIS ISSUE

What's in your first aid kit?

How to plan ahead for a horse's passing

 

 



CALENDAR

June 27
The Horseless Riding Lesson

 

 


Virtual Lesson Series

Longeing in Balance
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Lessons 1, 2 and 3

Together at a Special Discounted Price

 


 

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WHAT'S IN YOUR BARN FIRST AID KIT?

“Be Prepared” is a good motto for scouts and for horse owners.

I don’t travel with my horses very often, so a recent trek to an out-of-town clinic sent me rummaging through my first aid box – a 20-gallon plastic tote – for the necessities. I chose many of the obvious items – vetwrap, thermometer and stethoscope, iodine.

But as I have expanded my knowledge to beyond traditional veterinary first aid, I have come to rely on a number of less obvious items for the care and comfort of my equine companions and myself. My three “don’t leave home without it” items (whether or not I’m traveling with horses) are the following:

Bach Rescue Remedy
A blend of five of the 38 Bach flower essence remedies made with spring water infused with wild flowers, Rescue Remedy is great for diffusing stress, anxiety and any type of emotional upset in your horse and youself. This could include stress from travel or competition, fear in new situations or anxiety from illness or injury.

I carry a “treatment bottle” of Rescue Remedy in my vehicle at all times and have used it many times for people and animals under stresses ranging from injury to performance anxiety. Go to this page and scroll down to read how to create your own treatment bottle of RR.

Follow this link for more flower essences you might find useful when working with horses and other animals.    
                                                                                                        
read more


GUEST AUTHOR
M
AKING DECISIONS TODAY . . . TO MORE
CALMLY FACE AN INEVITABLE FUTURE

We are blessed beyond words to live our lives with horses. To share time, space, breath or a cool morning ride with them is truly a gift. And, so, the thought of a horse’s life ending can feel painfully difficult on many levels.

None of us wants the day to come. Most likely, we neatly push aside any thoughts of that final goodbye.

Yet, what if preparing for an unavoidable end could lessen the pain of that ending? Facing the truths of preparation is tough, yes. Doing so may well bring some calm in an even tougher situation, though. Since we have no idea when the end may come, this is a worthwhile consideration.

A kind endeavor than, could be making decisions today. By specifying how to handle such arrangements well ahead of time, you do so while you stand upon emotionally solid ground. Many of us in the urban area of Tucson have horses that live at a stable or on smaller residential horse properties. So, the discussion here is set in this context. General considerations could apply to any town, too.                                                                                         read more 


PRACTICAL AND EMOTIONAL PREP FOR A
H
ORSE'S PASSING

To help Tucson-area horse folks make grounded, proactive decisions about the eventual deaths of their equine companions, Kristine Bentz of Sweetgrass Ceremonies will lead an interactive session Monday, July 12, from 6:30-8 p.m. at River Valley Ranch. She will cover logistical issues and more details that answer the questions listed in her article, as well as provide a few brief pointers about memorializing a horse’s life. Cost for the session is $20 in advance and $25 that evening.

Please contact Kristine via email or call (520) 609-8396 for more information or to reserve your seat at the informative session.


 

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